DrPH Review Seminar: Acceptability and feasibility of an early intervention to support infants and children with Congenital Zika Syndrome and their families

DrPH Review Seminar

Acceptability and feasibility of an early intervention to support infants and children with Congenital Zika Syndrome and their families

Speaker: Antony Duttine
Supervisor: Hannah Kuper

Date: Monday 22nd May 2017 

Time: 13:00

Venue: Keppel St, LG7

A L L  W E L C O M E

Abstract

The 2015 Zika virus outbreak in South America has garnered global attention. The virus is now known to have a range of impacts on the developing foetus, including microcephaly, which collectively have become known as Congenital Zika Syndrome (CZS). Children affected by CZS may exhibit mild, moderate or severe physical, mental or sensorial disabilities. There have been 2653 cases of confirmed CZS in Brazil to date, and many more are suspected.
This DrPH research, part of a Wellcome funded project, aims to develop and pilot-test an adaption of an existing programme, Getting to Know Cerebral Palsy, for the Zika context. The programme is a series of about 10 group sessions facilitated by local experts to guide families and provide advice and support on raising children with CZS.
The aim of the research is to ascertain the need and feasibility (including acceptability) of a community intervention targeted at families of children with CZS. The intervention will be piloted in two sites: Rio De Janeiro and Salvador. Three groups, each of approximately 8-10 families of children with CZS will be hosted at each site, giving a total participant size of 48-60 families.
Need will be determined though literature reviews; findings from a sister project exploring the socio-economic impact of CZS; and discussion with experts and families. Feasibility of the intervention will be described the 8 facets proposed by Bowen et al (2009): acceptability, demand, implementation, practicality, adaptation, integration expansion, limited efficacy. These will be measured by a range of qualitative and quantitative methods including questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and cost description.
Positive demonstration of need, feasibility and acceptability will allow further dissemination of the programme inside and outside Brazil and additional research into the impact of the programme on the quality of life of both children with CZS and their families.

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