Evaluating the Impact of Rehabilitation in the Lives of People with Disabilities and their Families in Low and Middle Income Countries

Physical Impairment screening, India

Purpose of Report

This report has been commissioned by CBM, an international disability organisation working with local partners around the globe to improve the quality of life of the world‟s persons with disabilities who live in the most disadvantaged societies. CBM is increasingly interested in evidencing and evaluating the extent to which they are achieving this goal, so that they can plan and implement their programmes in the most cost-effective way. As there are many tools available for evaluating impact in the international literature, CBM commissioned this review in order to obtain clear guidance on how research can be carried across their programmes in order to generate high quality and reliable evidence on the impact of their programmes in the lives of people with disabilities and their families.

Full Report: Evaluating the Impact of Rehabilitation in the Lives of People with Disabilities and their Families in Low and Middle Income Countries

Contributors: Dr. Yasmene Alavi & Dr. Hannah Kuper with Ms Sneha Patel

Disability can be understood as “the outcome of the interaction between a person with an impairment and the environmental and attitudinal barriers he or she may face”1. This interaction can lead to a person being limited in doing activities and restricted in participating in society at large. This is the model of disablement defined by the World Health Organisation‟s (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

lt is estimated that there are 600 million people with disabilities globally. The vast majority (80%) live in low and middle income countries (LMICs), and disability is believed to affect disproportionately the most disadvantaged sector of the population.

Moreover, restricted participation in education and employment for people with disability (PWD) living in LMICs can further exacerbate their poverty.

The high proportion of PWDs in the world (10%) makes it very unlikely that the Millennium Development Goals can be achieved without mainstreaming disability into development initiatives. As the former president of the World Bank, James Wolfensohn, has said:

“Unless disabled people are brought into the development mainstream, it will be impossible to cut poverty in half by 2015 or to give every girl and boy the chance to achieve a primary education by the same date – goals agreed to by more than 180 world leaders at the United Nations Millennium Summit in September 2000.”

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