Key Informant Method

Door-to-door surveys are often used to identify children with disabilities in developing countries – either as beneficiaries for an intervention, or so as to be able to estimate numbers and plan services. These surveys can be costly and time consuming, and there is often a lack of comparability between studies and methods/definitions used.

The Key Informant Method (KIM) is a method that has previously been validated in the identification of children with severe visual impairment and blindness using trained, community volunteers in the place of a door-to-door survey.

KIM has been developed by a number of organisations working together to enable states and state parties to formulate suitable policies and programs.

The ICED is working with a number of partners using KIM in different settings. This KIM resources page will continue to be updated with literature and resources from these various projects.

Guide Front PageUsing the Key Informant Method to identify children with disabilities: A working guide (2015)

We have developed a Working Guide to using the KIM, building on our experiences using the Methodology and the lessons we’ve learnt along the way in our use of the KIM in various settings, as well as tips for the best outcomes. Download the working guide and it’s resources here.

The Malawi Key Informant Child Disability Project (2013-14)

The aim of this study was to use the KIM to estimate the prevalence of moderate/severe physical, sensory and intellectual impairments and epilepsy among children in two districts (Ntcheu and Thyolo) in Malawi.

The aim of this study was to use the KIM to estimate the prevalence of moderate/severe physical, sensory and intellectual impairments and epilepsy among children in two districts (Ntcheu and Thyolo) in Malawi.

The field team in Malawi

The field team in Malawi

 

 

 

For further information on the study, please contact or

The Child Disability and Malnutrition Project – Turkana, Kenya (2013-14)

The study aimed to assess:  a) whether children with disabilities were included within humanitarian aid in Turkana & b) whether there was an association between disability and malnutrition.

Grandmother with her grandson with a disability

Grandmother with her grandson with a disability

A “Mini KIM” was undertaken to identify children with disabilities for inclusion in the study.

You can download the full or summary report (in PDF or Word) below:

For further information on the study, please contact  or

Key Informant Child Disability Project in Bangladesh and Pakistan (2008 – 2013)

KIM Field Work in Bangladesh - mothers waiting at a medical screening camp

KIM Field Work – Bangladesh

This study set out to test whether voluntary, community-level Key Informants (KIs) could be trained to effectively identify children with moderate or severe physical impairments, sensory impairments (visual and hearing) or epilepsy in Bangladesh and Pakistan, and if so whether this process could be used to assess prevalence and plan appropriate referral services for children meeting these criteria.

The study also undertook a large door-to-door survey in Bangladesh to compare estimates produced using the different methods.

For further information on the study, please contact (Project Coordinator) or (Principal Investigator).

 

Comments are closed.